Connect with Nature Via the Capitol Corridor

April 9, 2019

Post updated March 29, 2019.

What comes to mind when you think of city living? The scene probably doesn’t involve lush greenery alongside fresh bodies of water stirring with wildlife. But that’s exactly what you can experience just steps from some of our stations! Fortunately, state- and federally- protected nature reserves keep many vulnerable habitats a priority amidst all the surrounding urban development. And whether it’s Earth Day (April 22) that’s raising your eco-antenna, or you’re a year-round outdoor enthusiast seeking new adventures, anytime is a good time to explore and appreciate our local natural wonders. Cruise on the Capitol Corridor to get up close and personal with some of the awe-inspiring ecosystems along our route, listed here from south to north. More Connect with Nature Via the Capitol Corridor

April Picks: Art in Martinez & San Jose, SF Cherry Blossom Festival & SF Beer Fest, Earth Day in Berkeley & Sacramento, and Oakland Dance Festival!

March 28, 2019

Spring has sprung, and it’s time to enjoy the outdoors at some of April’s liveliest festivals! If you’re a fan of art, culture, beer, or Mother Earth—or, simply put, anything that makes life awesome— you’ll have plenty of fun along the Capitol Corridor this month!

More April Picks: Art in Martinez & San Jose, SF Cherry Blossom Festival & SF Beer Fest, Earth Day in Berkeley & Sacramento, and Oakland Dance Festival!

Play Ball! Capitol Corridor’s Guide to Northern California Baseball Parks

March 25, 2019

This post was originally published on April 2, 2017 and was updated March 27, 2019.

Whether you’re a fan who keeps track of every stat, or you just enjoy singing “Take Me Out to the Ballgame” with a bag of peanuts and Cracker Jacks, you’ve got plenty of options for baseball fun in Northern California. No matter which team you’re rooting for — the A’s in Oakland, the Giants in San Francisco, or the River Cats in Sacramento — the Capitol Corridor makes your trip to the ballpark relaxing and fun. With spacious seating and tables for four, a Café Car serving food and beverages, and free Wi-Fi, you’ll be able to start the tailgate early or check the starting lineup on board. More Play Ball! Capitol Corridor’s Guide to Northern California Baseball Parks

A Day with Rosie: Uplifting Women in Transportation

March 20, 2019

On March 6, 2019, the Capitol Corridor sponsored a group of ten girls from the Sacramento chapter of Women’s Transportation Seminar (WTS) to ride the train to Rosie the Riveter National Park in Richmond.

WTS is an international organization dedicated to the advancement of women in the transportation industry. In the US, WTS offers Transportation YOU, an outreach and mentorship program for girls ages 13 to 18 that introduces them to a wide variety of transportation careers, and cultivates their interest and efficacy in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM).

Many of the girls selected to participate in Transportation YOU come from lower socioeconomic backgrounds, often lacking exposure to female representation in STEM. WTS Sacramento Board Member and group leader Julie Passalacqua knew that taking a field trip to Rosie the Riveter by train would be a valuable experience for these girls, who attend Sylvan Middle School in Citrus Heights, an underprivileged Sacramento suburb.

The day began when the group boarded at Sacramento Valley Station onto westbound Capitol Corridor train 531. Passalacqua said she found out on the day of the trip that only two of the ten girls had ever been on a train before. “For them, just riding the train to Richmond was exciting, and they were so excited even just going over the Benicia/Martinez bridge.”

“They said the best part of this trip was taking the train… It was a super easy, stress-free commute, and they were talking about how much more enjoyable it was to take the train and easier than if they had driven.”

Once the group arrived at Richmond Station, they connected to AC Transit with a free Transit Transfer from the Capitol Corridor, and were on their way to the museum. At Rosie the Riveter, the girls took a tour, watched video presentations, and had fun with interactive activities. They learned about the history of Home Front workers during WWII, specifically the recruitment of women and minorities into the workforce that transformed industrial centers like Richmond into “boom towns”.

The visit concluded with time for reflection and discussion. The girls were in awe of these women and were disappointed that they lost their new, well-paid jobs once the men came back from war.

Nevaeh Granados, age 13, said she had no idea that women worked in the shipyards and built ships. Irma Grajeda, age 12, shared her fascination. 13-year-old Karla Ceballos was amazed at how many aspects of our modern society are related to engineering— including the design and construction of trains, buses, roads, and routes. This realization encouraged both Karla and Irma to consider careers in transportation.

“I always feel so inspired after going on one of the engineering field trips,” said Irma. “I always feel like I can do anything I set my mind to do and the museum was proof that I can do a lot and that women are just as equal as men. It made me very happy to spend time with other girls and women who want to go into the sciences or engineering fields. I feel supported and thankful.”

The same was true for 13-year-old Vanessa Cruz, who said she has “had a lot of first times because of the WTS program, so I’m really grateful.”

In the past, Transportation You field trips have included the Forest Hill Bridge in Auburn, the Bay Bridge and boat tour, and the California State University Maritime Academy.

Passalacqua recalled a past trip with a group of high school girls to Teichert Aggregates Plant in Sacramento. The mining engineer who gave the group their tour was a woman, and the experience made such an impression on one of the young women that now, five years later, she is pursuing a degree in engineering at the University of Minnesota.

“This is someone who had never even thought of it as a career path,” Passalacqua said. “This is what we are going for. Even if we touch one girl, it’s a success.”

 

Written by Sylvia Sheehan